1573/4 – 1671

From the notes of Lynn Beedle (“Old Times, Vol.1, No. 1, Page 2.)

Edmund Greenleaf came to America about 1635. He was one of the first 18 principal settlers of Newbury, Massachusetts. He was born in 1573 or 1574 in England and died in 1671 in Boston, Massachusetts. His second marriage was to Mrs. Sarah Hill. Edmund was a silk-dyer by trade.

St. Mary’s La Tour, Ipswich, County Suffolk, England. Ancestors believed to be Huegenots (Fr. “Feuillevert”), came as refugees from France in the 16th Century. (See “The Greenleaf Family”, by Jas. Greenleaf)

Ipswich, England
Newbury, Massachusetts

From http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/jtrue/Greenlea.htm#Edmund

Edmund Greenleaf

Husband:
Edmund Greenleaf

Born:

in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, about 1590.

Died:

in Boston, MA, 24 March 1670/1.

Parents:

Unknown.

First Wife:
Sarah Dole

Born:

Place and date unknown.

Died:

in Boston, MA, 18 January 1663.

Parents:

Unknown.

Married:

in England.

Edmund Greenleaf married second Mrs. Sarah (Jordan) Hill, daughter of Ignatius Jordan.

Edmund was one of the original settlers of Quasca Cunquen, afterward Newbury, where each of the first settlers was granted a house lot of at least four acres, with a suitable quantity of salt and fresh meadow. In addition to this, he had a grant of twelve acres, which shows him to have been one of the eighteen principal pioneer settlers. Edmund lived near the old town bridge in Newbury, where he kept a tavern. By trade, he was a silk dyer. He was Ensign in 1639, Lieutenant in 1645, and Captain of the Militia under William Gerrish. He and Sarah moved to Boston about 1650.

Edmund and his wife Sarah (Dole) Greenleaf had ten children, all baptized at St. Marys la Tour in Ipswich, County Suffolk, England:

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Enoch, bpt. 1 Dec. 1613; d. 1617.

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Samuel, b. date unknown; d. 1627.

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Enoch, b. about 1617/8; m. Mary —–.

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Sarah, bpt. 26 March 1620; m. William Hilton, son of William Hilton.

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Elizabeth, bpt. 16 Jan. 1622; m. (1) in 1642 or earlier, Giles Badger; m. (2) 16 Feb. 1648/9 Richard Browne.

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Nathaniel, bpt. 27 June 1624; d. 1634.

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Judith, bpt. 2 Sept. 1625; m. (1) Henry Somerby; m. (2) Tristram Coffin, Jr.

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Stephen, bpt. 10 Aug. 1628; m. (1) Elizabeth Coffin, daughter of Tristram Coffin; m. (2) Mrs. Esther Swett.

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Daniel, bpt. 14 Aug. 1631; d. 5 Dec. 1654.

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John, b. about 1632; m. Hannah Veazie, daughter of William Veazie.

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From http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Metro/4985/green002.htm:

There seems to be some confusion on Edmund’s first wife’s name.  The paragraph below headed “Sara, First Wife of Edmund Greenleaf” states that Sara Dole was Edmund’s first wife, which matches Lynn Beedle’s research.  Additionally, Tristram Coffin is named as one of the executors of Edmund’s will.

Generation Two

2Edmund2 Greenleaf (John1)3,2,2 was baptized on 2 January 1573/74 in St. Mary’s la Tour, Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England.3 He and Sarah Moore were married on 2 July 1611 in Langford, co. Essex, England.4 He and Sarah Jurdaine were married after 1663 in Massachusetts.5 He died on 24 March 1670/71 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at age 97.3,6

He was also known as Capt. Edmund Greenleaf.7 He immigrated in 1635 to Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.2 He was made a freeman on 13 March 1638 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.8,2 As of 1642, he was also known as Lieutenant EdmundGreenleaf.9 He ended military service on 11 November 1647 in Massachusetts; Requests discharge from military service.7 He and Sarah Moore emigrated circa 1650 from Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.7 He left a will on 25 December 1668 in Massachusetts; Estate of Edmund Greenleaf of Newbury/Boston

Essex Probate Docket # None

In the name of God, Amen. The two and twentieth day of December, sixteen hundred and sixty-eight, I, Edmund Greenleaf mindful of my own mortality and certainty of death, and uncertain of the same, and being desirous to settle things in order, being now in good health and perfect memory, do make, appoint and ordain this to be my last will and testament in manner and form following; that is to say first and principally, I give and bequeath my soul into the hands of my blessed Redeemer, the Lord Jesus, who hath died and gave himself for me and his blood cleanseth from all sin, and through his righteousness I do only look for justification and salvation; and do commit my mortal body after this life is ended, into the dust from whence it was taken there to be preserved by the power and faithfulness of my Redeemer Jesus Christ until the resurrection of the just, and then to be raised up by the same power to immortality and life, where I shall see him as he is, and shall ever be with him; and in this faith and hope I desire, through his grace and assistance, to live and die, and at last to be found of him in peace.

Nextly, my will is, being according to God’s will revealed in the word, that we must pay what we owe and live of the rest unto whose rule the sons of men ought to frame their wills and actions; therefore my mind and will is that my debts shall be truly and justly paid to every man to whom I shall be indebted, by my executors hereafter named.

And first I do revoke, renounce frustrate and make void all wills by me formerly made ; and I declare and appoint this to be my last will and testament.

Imprimis – I give unto to my son Stephen Greenleaf, and to my daughter Browne, widow, and to my daughter Coffin to each I twenty shillings apiece.

Item – I give unto my grandchild Elizabeth Hilton ten pounds.

Item – I give unto my grandchild Enoch Greenleaf ten pounds.

Item – I give unto my grandchild Sarah Winslow, five pounds if her, father pay me the four pounds he oweth me.

Item – I give unto my eldest son’s son, James Greenleaf, twenty shillings; and after my funeral debts and legacies are discharged,

I give and bequeath the rest of my estate unto my son Stephen Greenleaf, and to my daughter Elizabeth Browne and to my daughter Judith Coffin, equally to be divided amongst them and their children.

And, further, I desire ad appoint my son Stephen Greenleaf, and Tristram Coffin the executors of this my will see it executed and affirmed as near as they can; and I further entreat my cousin Thomas. Moon, mariner to see to the performance of this my will.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this twenty-fifth day of December, 1668.

(Signed) EDMUND Greenleaf [L.S.]

Signed, sealed, published, and declared to be my last will in the presence of us,

George Ruggell

John Furnside

The inventory of Mr. Greenleaf’s estate, which was, appended to the will amounted to £131-5s-9d The following paper is also recorded in the “Probate Records,” appended to the will, as, probably, assigning the reason why the name of his second wife, who appears to have outlived him, was not mentioned:

I married my wife I kept her grandchild, as I best remember, three years to schooling, diet and apparel; and William Hill, her son, had a bond of six pounds a year, whereof I received no more than a barrel of pork of £3. 0s. 0d of that £6. 0s. 0d. a year, he was to pay me, and sent to her son Ignatius Hill, to the Barbados, in mackeral cider, and bread and pease, as much as come to twenty pounds, and never received one penny of it. His aunt gave to the three brothers £50 apiece. I know not of whether they received it or no; but I have or received any part of it.

Witness my hand. (Signed) Edmund Greenleaf

Besides when I married my wife, she brought me a silver bowl a silver porringer, and a silver spoon. She lent on gave them to her son, James Hill, without my consent.

Source: Boston Probate Records 1669-1674, pg. 112 as printed in:Genealogy of the Greenleaf Family, James Edward Greenleaf, Boston, 1896.10 He will was proven on 12 February 1671/72 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.7

Of the origin of the family, from all that can be gathered, it is believed that the ancestors of Edmund were Huguenots, the name being a translation of the French “Feuillevert.” As the name has not been found among the English parishes, other than at Ipswich, County of Suffolk, England, it is believed that the family (Feuillevert) came as French refugees to England with many other Huguenots, who fled from their homes on account of their religious principles, and settled in England some time in the sixteenth century. Edmund Greenleaf was a silk-dyer by trade; a trade that does not appear among the English industries until about the time of the coming of the French refugees.

On the parish records of St. Mary’s la Tour in Ipswich, County Suffolk, England, is recorded: “Edmund Greenleaf, son of John and Margaret, was baptized 2 Jan. 1574.” This may be too early for the Edmund Greenleaf who came to America. Other sources suggest a birth date about 1590.

In 1634 he came to Massachusetts from England aboard the Mary and John. He was one of the first settlers to come by water to Newbury, Massachusetts, Agawan Plantation near Ipswich, Massachusetts. He had nine children in England. In Newbury, Massachusettshe was made a freeman on 13 March 1638/9. 22 May 1639 he was permitted to keep a house of entertainment. Captain, later an Ensign was granted 122 acres. Lived by the old town bridge in Newbury. He also had a tavern. Commissioner of the General Court to end small businesses in 1642. By trade he was a silk-dyer. Removed to Boston about 1650; his dyehouse located by the spring 30 (5) 1655. His will dated 22 Dec. 1668, probated 12 (2) 1671.

Among the family relics still preserved is the cane brought to this country by Edmund Greenleaf; it bears the initials “J. G.” on a silver band near the handle.

All of the nine children named in the chart, and whose baptismal records and deaths appear on the parish records of St. Mary’s before mentioned, were born in England. Mr. Greenleaf lived near the old town bridge in Newbury, where for some years he kept a tavern. He was admitted a freeman on 13 March 1639,* and on 22 May of the same year was “permitted to keep a house of entertainment.”

[* A freeman in the early days of the colonies was one who held the right of franchise. No one was allowed that right without first becoming a member of the church. The laws were made by a quorum of the “assistants” or “magistrates” sent out and commissioned by the company in London, which held the charter.

The law compelling church membership was passed by the “assistants” in 1631. In 1676 five sixths of the people of Boston were non-voters, because they were not church members, and were thus shut out from any participation in the local government.]

The name of Edmund Greenleaf appears: – June 1, 1642.- “On a commission of Newbury.” Sept. 8, 1642.- “Ordered to send home an Indian woman.” Sept. 27, 1642.- “On a committee to take charge of certain orders by the council.” Nov. 11, 1647.-Requests his “discharge from military service.” May 2, 1649.-On appraisement of real estate. (Massachusetts Bay Records, Vol. I. page 258; Vol.II. pages 16, 23, 30, 215, and 276).

Capt. Edmund Greenleaf moved to Boston with his wife Sarah about 1650 (New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. VI. Page 102), where he buried his wife, and afterwards married Mrs. Sarah Hill, widow of – Wilson, 2d, of William Hill, of Fairfield, Connecticut, who had several children by her former marriage. This marriage was rather an unhappy one. In the early part of 1671 Mr. Greenleaf died. His will, a very curious document, written, as is supposed, by himself, was proved 12 Feb. 1671, and is recorded in the “Probate Records” in Boston, in the volume for 1669 to 1674, page 112.

The following is a copy, the orthography being corrected: – “In the name of God, Amen. The two and twentieth day of December, sixteen hundred and sixty-eight, I, Edmund Greenleaf, being mindful of my own mortality and certainty of death, and uncertainty of the same, and being desirous to settle things in order, being now in good health and perfect memory, do make, appoint and ordain this to be my last will and testament in manner and form following: that is to say-first and principally, I give and bequeath my soul into the hands of my blessed Redeemer, the Lord Jesus, who hath died and gave himself for me, and his blood cleanseth from all sin, and through his righteousness I do only look for justification and salvation; and do commit my mortal body, after this life is ended, into the dust from whence it was taken, there to be preserved by the power and faithfulness of my Redeemer, Jesus Christ, until the resurrection of the just, and then to be raised up by the same power to immortality and life, where I shall see him as he is, and shall ever be with him; and in this faith and hope I desire, through his grace and assistance, to live and die, and at last to be found of him in peace.

“Nextly, my will is, being according to God’s will revealed in his word, that we must pay what we owe and live of the rest, unto whose rule the sons of men ought to frame their wills and actions; therefore, my mind and will is, that my debts shall be truly and justly paid to every man to whom I shall be indebted, by my executors hereafter named.

“And first I do revoke, renounce, frustrate and make void all wills by me formerly made; and I declare and appoint this to be my last will and testament.

“Imprimis-I give unto my son Stephen Greenleaf, and to my daughter Browne, widow, and to my daughter Coffin, to each of them twenty shillings apiece. Item-I give unto my grandchild Elizabeth Hilton, ten pounds. Item-I give unto my grandchild Enoch Greenleaf, five pounds. Item-I give unto my grandchild Sarah Winslow, five pounds, if her father pay me the four pounds he oweth me. Item-I give unto my eldest son’s son, James Greenleaf, twenty shillings; and after my funeral expenses, debts and legacies are discharged, I give and bequeath the rest of my estate unto my son Stephen Greenleaf, and to my daughter Elizabeth Browne, and to my daughter Judith Coffin, equally to be divided amongst them and their children. And, further, I desire and appoint my son, Stephen Greenleaf, and Tristram Coffin the executors of this my will, to see it executed and affirmed as near as they can; and I further entreat my cousin, Thomas Moon, mariner, to see to the performance of this my will.

“In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this twenty-fifth day of December, 1668.

(Signed) EDMUND GREENLEAF

“Signed, sealed, published, and declared to be my last will in the presence of us,

“GEORGE RUGGELL”, “JOHN FURNISIDE.”

The inventory of of Mr. Greenleaf’s estate, which was appended to the will, amounted to £131-5-9

.

The following paper is also recorded in the Probate Records, appended to the will, as, probably, assigning the reason why the name of his second wife, who appears to have outlived him, was not mentioned: –

“When I married my wife, I kept her grandchild, as I best remember, three years to schooling, diet and apparel; and William Hill, her son, had a bond of six pounds a year, whereof I received no more than a barrel of pork of £3-0-0 of that £6-0-0 a year he was to pay me, and sent to her son Ignatius Hill, to the Barbadoes, in mackerel, cider, and bread and pease. as much as come to twenty pounds, and never received one penny of it. His aunt gave to the three brothers £50 apiece. I know not whether they received it or no; but I have not received any part of it.

“Witness my hand. (Signed) Edmund Greenleaf.”

“Besides, when I married my wife, she brought me a silver bowl, a silver porringer, and a silver spoon. She lent or gave them to her son, James Hill, without my consent.”

NOTE. In reading the personal sketches of some of our early ancestors it will be observed that little is said of individual characteristics, personal appearance, etc. Search has been made in vain for such accounts concerning Edmund Greenleaf and some others. Could we have found in these early days some such biographical material and correspondence as appears in our time it would have been more satisfying. We want to know more in detail, more of the life of those who so earnestly wrought out our early history, and gave form to our destinies, an insight to their chief characteristics, and to follow them, with the mind’s eye, through all the vicissitudes of their life; to be with them in their storm and sunshine; that we may the better realize their trials, adversities, and joys, and catch at least a glimpse of the experiences of their sympathies and affections.11

Sarah Moore12,13,13 was baptized on 13 December 1588 in All Saints parish, Maldon, co. Essex, England.14 She died on 18 January 1662/63 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at age 74.9,15,16 She was buried in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.7

SARA, FIRST WIFE OF EDMUND GREENLEAF

(1588-1663)

By MRS. DOROTHY GREENLEAF BOYNTON, of Elkhart, Indiana

Edmund Greenleaf, the original ancestor of the Greenleaf family in America, is known to have come from Ipswich, Suffolk, where the registers of St. Mary’s at the Tower and St. Margaret’s record the baptism of his children between 1613 and 1631. Numerous efforts have been made to determine Edmund’s ancestry without success, although bits of information have been found but all is speculation so far, for example see J. Gardner Bartlett’s note in THE REGISTER, vol. 69, p. 358-359, October 1915. Thirty years before this William Sumner Appleton, in an article “The Greenleaf Ancestry” pointed out that the will of Edmund, dated 25 Dec. 1668, made a bequest to his eldest son’s son James when actually no such grandson could be found (ibid., vol. 38, p. 299-301, July 1884; see also p. 322 in the same volume for detail about Edmund’s second wife).

In the obituary of Charles C. Beaman of Boston in THE REGISTER, vol. 38, p. 100, January 1884, it is definitely stated that Edmund’s wife was named Sarah Dole. James Edward Greenleaf’s Genealogy of the Greenleaf Family, 1896 (pp. 71-74, 190), continues this claim and gives information on the Dole family.

With the help of Mr. T. Woodard of Laughton, co. Essex, I have attempted to solve the question of Edmund’s parentage. Mr. Woodard reports that not all Ipswich parish records are available and that some are known to be copies from older registers, which means that errors and omissions are quite possible. In our search some few additional facts have been turned up but nothing conclusive. However, a real step toward the solution of the Greenleaf puzzle can be reported because definite proof of the parentage of Sarah, the mother of his children, has been found.

The author by chance saw in the Essex volumes of the Boyd Marriage Index an entry, “Moor Sar and Edm Greenleaf Langford” Women’s Volume, p. 33, copy in Salt Lake City). The time, 1611, was about right, the names are right and seemed to explain the Cousin Thomas Moor, the overseer of Edmund’s will.

To be absolutely sure Mr. Woodard was employed to look for proof. This he found in the will of Samuel More of the Parish of Much Totham, co. Essex, dated 24 Dec. 1615 and proved by his brother Francis More the 2nd of February following. A transcription of the will follows: In the name of God Amen the 24th day of December in the year of our Lord god 1615. I Samuell More late of Much Totharn in the county of Essex husband-man being poor of body but of good and perfect remembrance (thanks be given unto almighty god) Do make and ordayn my last will and testament in manner and forme following: First I commend my soule into the hands of god my creator hoping through the . . merits of Jesus Christ my Blessed savior that att the generall resurrection both body and soule shall be rejoincd together and made perteker of his everlasting kingdom: I bequeath my body unto the earth from which it first came to be buried in decent Christian burial att the Discretion of my Executor.

Item I give to the poor of Much Birch at the time of my . . . six shillings eight pence to be payd at the discretion of the minister and brothers:

Item I give unto my sister Sara the wife of Edmund Grinleaf of Ipswich in the county of Suffolk a Bedsted [and] a flockbed one bolster two pillows.

Item I give unto her two children John and Enoch either of them ten pounds of lawful english money . . .sayd summe my will is shall be paid by my executor to Edmond Grinleaf their father for their use and he enter bond unto my sayd executor for the true payment thereof and . – . from me when they shall come to the several ages of one and twenty years: Item I give to Anna Hewster my Aunt twenty shillings to buy her a gold ring to be worn by her for my sake.

Item I give unto my father Enoch More of Haverill the like summe of twenty shillings: Item I give unto Enoch more my brother and to my two sisters Merry and Judith to each of them six shillings eight pence.

All the residue of my goods and shattells unto him as well moveables and imoveables I give unto Francis More my brother whom I nominate and ordayn my sole Executor: And lastly I do — . Nicholas More of Mauldon my Uncle to be supervisor unto this my will unto whom I give for his payment twenty shillings: in witness whereof I have hereto set my hand the Day and Year above written

Samuell More In presence of

His mark Robert Ham (?) Edward —— (maybe Bailer or Kailer)

John Hewster

Arthur Gaywood (Bishop of London Commissory in Essex, Essex Record Office, Chelmsford).

Reference to the parish registers of Maldon, co. Essex (to be found in the old library attached to the medieval tower of St. Peter’s church) gives a few of the vital statistics of the family, though they have to be used in conjunction with the existing wills, two of which are those of Nicholas and Willamin Moore, the paternal grandparents of Sara (More) Greenleaf. Nicholas Moore, according to the parish records of St. Peter’s, was living in that parish when his son Enoch was baptized, 19 Jan. 1560-1, but by 17 Sept. 1570, when Nicholas the Younger was baptized, the family was in All Saints parish. No other baptisms of their children are recorded though there were sons Samuel, Thomas and Edward, and daughters Anna and Phillip, according to the various wills.

Marriages [Moor- Moore]

1585 Enoch and Catherine

23 November 1605-6 Edward and Elizabeth Burton

6 February 1612 Thomas and Bridget Lufkin

31 May [Recorded as Bridget Lusk in St. Peter’s]

1618 Phillip and William Harrington 31 August

Burials [Moor-Moore]

1593 Catherine

11 October 1594 Nicholas

8 October 1606 Willamin

20 July 1617 Bridget

12 September 1619 Edward

6 November 1622-3 Elizabeth

9 February 1624 Thomas

19 September 1646 Nicholas

30 May

Baptisms [Moor-Moore]

(St. Peter’s)

1560-1 Enoch Jan. 19

(All Saints) 1570 Nicholas the Younger

17 September 1588 Sara daughter of Enoch

13 December 1590 Anne daughter of Thomas

8 May 1591 Samuel son of Enoch

20 April 1591 Nicholas son of Thomas

6 October 1592 Francis son of Enoch

2 September 1594 Felice daughter of Thomas

4 July 1622 Edward son of Nicholas

14 July

As is apparent from the above records the parents of Sara were married in All Saints parish 23 Nov. 1585. Sara herself was baptized there 13 Dec 1588, probably not far inside the curious triangular tower to be seen in Maldon today. Her mother died in that parish a little more than a month after the birth of Sara’s brother Francis and was buried 11 Oct. 1593. At some time, perhaps after his father’s death in 1594, Enoch Moore moved to Haverhill, co. Suffolk. By 1599, according to a fragmentary record found in the Withington material (Essex Institute, Salem, Mass.), Enoch had married again for the baptism of daughters Mary and Jane occurred in Haverhill. This scrap may have come from the Bishop’s transcripts and could be an indication that other bits of information will in time turn up even though the Haverhill parish records are said not to have survived.

It would appear that the daughter Jane did not live because the will of Samuel of Much Totham, given above, speaks of only sisters Merry and Judith in addition to Sara. It tells us, however, that Samuel had a brother Enoch, that Enoch, Sr., was still living in Haverhill in 1615 and Francis was the brother he chose as his main heir.

One of the most important facts given in Samuel’s will is that Sara and Edmund had in 1615 two sons, John and Enoch. The list of children baptized in Ipswich does not include John, the first born, nor was he baptized in Langford or Maldon, the parish records of which have been examined. The second son Enoch was baptized 1 Dec. 1613 at St. Mary’s le Tour in Ipswich. Then Edmund and Sara moved to St. Margaret’s parish, where we find the following Greenleaf entries:

Baptisms

1615-6 Samuel son of Edmund and Sarah

8 January 1617-8 Enoch son of Edmund and Sarah

20 March 1620-1 Sara daughter of Edmund and Sarah

26 March 1621-2 Elizabeth daughter of Edmund and Sarah

16 January 1624 Nathaniel son of Edmund and Sarah

27 June 1626 Judith daughter of Edmund and Sarah

29 September 1628 Stephen son of Edmund and Sarah

10 August 1631 Daniel son of Edmund and Sarah

14 August Burials 1617 Enoch son of Edmund and Sarah

12 September 1616-7 Samuel son of Edmund and Sara

5 March 1633 Nathaniel son of Edmund and Sara 24 July

The naming of John, the first born son, in the will of his uncle, Samuel More, who, as far as we can know, survived baby-hood, explains the bequest of Edmund Greenleaf to a grandson James, his eldest son’s son. One cannot help surmising that John Greenleaf, the silk dyer of St. Andrews Undershof, London, who married Hester Hoste, daughter of James Host of Stepney, 18 May 1636, in St. Augustine’s church near Paul’s Gate in London, may have been that eldest son and elected to remain in England when the rest of the family migrated. For him the usual pattern would be to name a son James. It might also be that the John Greenleaf who married in Braintree, Mass., whom nobody has been able to place might be another grandson though it is granted that actual proof is needed. Also curiously an Edmund Grenelif, a mariner, in the City of Tangier, made a will, dated 10 April 1670, in which he left a dwelling in the parish of Stepney to his wife, if she was living-it was proved 21 Jan. 1670-1 by Hannah Greneleafe, the widow (see James Edward Greenleaf, op. cit., p. 499, under “Enoch Greenleaf;” also p. 472, the account of John of Braintree; the will of Edmund of Tangier is filed in London).

Returning to the history of Sara (More) Greenleaf, is seems apparent that she came from a family of considerable substance; possibly a search of the town records of Maldon would reveal interesting information. The wills of her grandparents, Nicholas and Willamin Moore and their younger sons Nicholas and Edward as well as the latter’s wife, are all to be found in Chelmsford, the shire town of Essex.

The oldest will so far found is that of Nicholas Moore, written by his son Samuel as clerk, 18 Aug. 1590, and proved in Chelmsford by Samuel as attorney for his mother, 22 Oct. 1594. Enoch and Nicholas the Younger were the witnesses.

In the name of god amen Anno 1590 the 18th daye of August in the 32nd yere of the Reigne of Soverigne Lady Elizabeth by the grace of god of England France and Ireland Queene Defender of the Faith 1 Nicholas Moore of Maldon in the County of Essex and . . diocesse Sick of body but of sound and perfect memory god be thanked doe ordayne and make this my . . . last will and testament in manner and forme folowinge.

First I bequeath my soule into the hands of almight god my creator and Redeemer and my body to the earth in sure hope of Resurrection with the Just through my Lord and Savior Christ Jesus.

Item I give and bequeath unto Willamin my wife my notage (?) or tenament situated in Maldon aforesaid in the street called ifulbridge street now in the tenure and occupation of Thomas Moore my son and of his assignes, to have and to hold the same to her and her heirs forever.

Item I give and bequeath Unto her my said wife my lease and tenure of.. -that I have in the house that I now dwelt in To have and to hold the same unto her and her assignes payinge the rent and discharging the covenante in the same lease specified.

Lastly I give and bequeath unto the said Willamin my wife all and singular my other moveables good debts Stock of leather.. . Tallow oile and all other my chattles and Implements of household in hand I make and ordain my sole executrix revokinge all – – wills whatsoever In witness whereof I have to this… set my hand and seale the Daye and Year above written Signum hefi [i.e. the mark of] Nicholas Moore In the …of Enoch Moore Nicholas Moore the Younger Et mei Samueila Moore Script

Then in 1603 the following will was written for Willamin, his widow:

In the name of god Amen the thirtieth daye of August in the year of our Lorde James by the grace of god now kinge of Englande I willamin Moore of the parish of all Saints in maldon in the county of Essex Wyddow being now vely weaken bodye by reason of my great age and years whereby I am put in remembrance that my time and end approacheth and cometh on a pace, do therefore make pubushe and declare this my last will and testament in writing in manner and forme following: First I commend my Soule into the hands of almighty god the Father the sonne and the holy ghost assuredly believing that all my Sinnes of gods great mercy in Jesus christ are doomed and done away And my bodie I comytt to christian bury-all at the discretion of the executor of this my last will and testament here under named.

Item I will and give unto my sonne nicholas Moore my tenement with the appertances situated and being in or near agenst Fulbridge street in the parish of Saint Peter in maldon aforesaid now in the tenure and occupation of [?] hybberd wyddow or her assigns to have and to hold the said tenement with appertances unto the said nicholas his heirs and assigns forever.

Item I give and bequeath unto the said nicholas a hall bedstead standing in the chamber over the hall of the messauge in which I now dwell and a downe bed now being thereon and other the bedding and furniture thereunto belonging in all things fully furnished and a . — chest in the same chamber with all the linen in the same chest.

And it is in my minde and will that if in future the said nicholas (after my death) to marrye or to settle and occupe (by himself) the trade of a shoemaker that then the executor of this my testament shall immediately thereupon pay and deliver to him the said nicholas (as my gift) ten pounds of lawful money of england.

Item I give and bequeath Unto Sara Moore the daughter of my sonne Enoch Moore Five pounds of lawful english money to be payd her by my executor at her age of 21 years or day of marriage which shall first happen.

Then I will and give to be paid by my executor uppon my buryall unto my sonnes Samuel Enoch and Thomas Moore and to my daughters Anne and Phillip to everyone of the same my children (in token of a friendly remembrance) Five shillings a piece and no more for that my said daughters and ye one of my said sonnes last named have had already their full portions.

All the rest of my goods moveable household stuff and implements of household and whatsoever ellse I have or may dispose of that is testamentary l give fully and wholly unto Edward Moore my Sonne whome I do make constitute and ordain sole and only executor of this my last will and testament and him do appoint and require to pay my funerall and debts and the legacies of this my testament In witness whereof I have hereunto put my Seale subscribed my name the day and year first above written.

the marke of In the prive of George Purcas [?]

Willamin Moore widdow Thomas Chesse the writer hereof

The above will was proved in 1606. It indicates that Willamin and her husband must have had quite a little property since five of their children had already had their portions. One wonders also whether Sara had not made her home with her grandmother as she is the only grandchild mentioned, although both Thomas and Enoch had other children. Sara had been about six when her mother died and fifteen when her grandmother’s will was drawn and past seventeen when Willamin actually died- In July 1611 Sara was still in the Maldon area as Langford and its church of St. Giles in which she and Edmund were married is practically a part of Maldon today.

Edward Moore’s will was drawn up 30 April 1617 and was proved 10 Dec. 1619, about a month after his burial- His will provided care-fully for his wife thus giving us a pretty good picture of the kind of home in which the Moores evidently lived and some idea as to where their property was located, Searching in those areas might take us back further in time. One might surmise that the brother Samuel had died since he is not mentioned. The mother’s will was written in 1603. The will follows:

In the name of god amen the Thirtieth day of April in the yere of our Lord one Thousand Six hundred and seventeen and in the ffifteenth yere of the reigne of our Soveringne Lord James by the grace of god now king of England I Edward Moore of the parish of All Saints in maldon in the county of Essex shoomaker being weeke in body yet of sound and perfect memory (thanks be god) knowing that all men are subject to mortality do therefore make publize and declare this my last will and testament in writing in manner and form folowing.

First and principally I commend my Soule into the hands of almighty god (that blessed trinity) the father the sonne and the holy ghost assuredly believing by faith in my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ of god’s great mercy in him that all my synnes are freely forgiven and that eternal life in the heavens is reserved for me after the end of this mortall life. And my body I comytt to christian Buryall at the discretion and appointment of Elizabeth my well beloved wife and of the executor of this my last will and testament hereinafter named.

And as touching my Lands and possessions and other things of this life my minde and will is thereof as followeth: First I give unto the sayd Elizabeth my wife all the movable goods household stuff and Implements of household and bedding which she had before my intermarriage with her (Excepting the linen brass and pewter which I had with her).

Item I give to the sayd Elizabeth my wife all the wearing apparell linen and rayment and also a featherbed a feather bowlster a great joined chest… with a drawer which now standeth in the chamber over the Buttery

And I give unto the said Elizabeth one half of all the linen brass and pewter whatsoever whereof I am now possessed Excepting only the brass pannies now used for my trade for stuffing [?] or currying of Leather to be indifferently divided and set out unto her by my brother Thomas Moore and my Brother-in-law John Hewster or the survivor of them with all convenient speede next after my death and also I give unto the said Elizabeth five pounds of lawful money of England to be payd unto her by my said Executor within one month next after my death

Item I give unto the said Elizabeth one of my two drawing tables (to be taken at her choice) my settall in the hall and two reasonable loads of wood.

Item my minde and will is that the said Elizabeth my wife shall have and enjoy for and during the time of her naturall life if she so longe for time to life solo and unmarryed and not other wife the use and occupation of the great chamber over the shopp of my now dwelling house with convenient room and place in my yarde or backside for laying and bestowing of her wood and also a piece of my garden (of twenty ffeet square) and also the joint or common use and benefitt (with the tenant or dweller in my dwelling house for the time being) of one chamber therein called the storyers chamber hanging and drying of the linen with free accesse ingresse egresse and regresse by and through my said dwelling house Unto and from the said chamber’s yard and garden and any of them at all times and from time to time without any lett or molestation whatsoever.

Item I give and will to be payd unto the sayd Elizabeth by my said executor or his assignes after my death yearly every year during the time of her natural life (at the messauge in which I dwell one early sume of Five pounds of lawful money of England at the ffour usual ffeasts and times of payment in the year by equal portyons for and in full compensation and satisfaction of the estate jointure dower or things which to her shall or may arrive or grow after my death of in and to or Out of my lands and tenements whatsoever either freeholds or copy-holds which I am now seized or shall be seized at my death or an estate of inheritance (the first payment thereof to begin and to be made at first one of the said ffeasts which shall first happen and come next after my death)

Item I will and do devise and give unto my Brother Nicholas Moore his heirs and assigns forever those two tenements (customary or copyhold to the manor of Bradwell juxta Mare in the said county of Essex) whereof one is called Reeves containing by estimation ten acres of land and that which is called ffeldmans containing by estimation eight acres of land with their appertances and all my estate reversion [?] and remaynder of and in the said tenements and lands after the death of the said Elizabeth my wife.

Item I devise will and give unto my sayd Brother Nicholas Moore his heir and assignes forever the said messauge (in which I dwell) situated and being in the said parish of All Saints in maldon aforesaid with the edifice [?] buildings yards backsides gardens and orchards ways and easments to the sayd messauge belonging or now used and other appertances.

Item I will and do give unto the said Nicholas Moore my Brother one messauge and six acres of land with the appertances called Myllers late in the tenure and occupation of Robert Sooke in the said county of Essex’ to have and to hold to the sayd Nicholas Moore his heirs and assignes forever according to the custom of the said manor.

Item I give and bequeath unto Francis Moore the sonne of my Brother Enoche Moore ten pounds of lawful english money to be payd to him by my sayd Executor within one yere next after my decease (over and besides the ten pounds which I am to pay him for and out of the rent and profitts of a certain shop situated in the sayd parish of all Saints near unto the ffish stalls).

Item I give unto Nicholas Moore and Phillip Moore the sonne and daughter of my Brother Thomas Moore to either of them ten pounds a piece of like money to be payd within one year next after my decease by my said Executor.

And I give unto my said Brothers Enoch and Thomas Moore to either of them tenne shillings a piece and to my Sister Phillip ffive Shillings of lawful english money as a small remembrance of my Love and goodwill to them.

Item I give to the poor of All Saints parish in maldon aforesaid Six shillings and eight pence to be payd to the overseers of the said poore within three months next after my death.

All the rest of my goods chattles movables household stuff and implements of household wares shop stuff ready money and debts and whatsoever ellse I have or may dispose that is testamentary I do give fully and wholly unto the said Nicholas Moore my brother which said Nicholas I do make and constitute sole and only Executor of this my last will and testament and I require and charge him duly and truly to pay my funerall charges and debts and the legacies and portions of money by this testament bequeathed provided always and nevertheless my minde and full meaning and will is that if at the time of my decease there shall be a surrender in force to the use of my will of and concerning my said coppyhold lands and tenements holden of the manor of Walton aforesaid that then the said Nicholas Moore my Brother after my decease and before probate of this my testament shall become bounden by Deede obligatory sufficient in the – . unto the said Elizabeth my wife in the Some of Thirty Pounds of lawful money of England with condition thereon for the sure payment of the said yearly Some of ffive Pounds by the year to the said Elizabeth yearly during her life in the manner and order and according to the effect and purpose afore declared in this my will; But if no sure Surrender shall from time to be at my death of the said copyhold lands and tenements last mentioned for the use of my will that then the said gift of ffive Pounds a year to my wife yearly during her life shall be voided and of no effect (any thinge afore in this my will confirmed to the contrary in any wise not with-standing). In witness whereof I the said Edward Moore to this my last will and testament have put my seale and subscribed my name the day and year first above written in the presence of the persons herein-under named Joseph Walker John Dandy and Thomas Chese [? Chase, one of Enoch’s daughters married the apothecary Thomas Chese of Boston] Edward Moore.

Elizabeth, the widow of Edward Moore, had her will drawn 18 Jan. 1622, giving the property that was hers to distribute to her children of her first marriage, a son William Burton and a daughter Elizabeth, then the wife of a John Merrill, with two sons John and William. From the Greenleaf-Moore point of view this will has little of interest.

Nicholas Moore the Younger left a will, also available in Chelmsford, dated 21 April 1646 and probated 23 June. Like his brothers he could sign his name at least indicating reasonable education for the time. His property went to his widow Margaret except for a silver wine bowl as he said his son, Edward, had had his share already though likely as an only child he would in the end get the rest just as he got the Bradwell juxta Mare property after his Aunt Elizabeth’s death as his Uncle Edward had directed.

Unfortunately no wills have been found for either Samuel, who seems to have gotten special education, Thomas, or Sarah’s father Enoch, though perhaps through related families some more information may yet be garnered.

Of special interest, however, is Sarah’s brother Francis who appears in two of the wills. It seems reasonable to think that he was the father of Cousin Thomas Moore, the mariner of Boston, who Edmund years later on this side of the Atlantic made overseer of his will.

Francis Moore, Jr., of Cambridge, Mass., called Thomas Moore of Boston his brother in his will, probated 23 Feb. 1689. Francis, if his recorded age at death was correct, was born about 1620. Thomas who was reported to have died at 66 on 5 Jan. 1689-90 would have been born about 1623 (see Lucius R. Page’s History of Cambridge, Genealogical Register Supplement and Index by Mary Isabella Gozzaldi, 1980, p.517, reference 611).

The father of these men, Francis Moore, Sr., according to Savage’s Dictionary, became a freeman in Cambridge 22 May 1639. His wife Katherine died in 1648, after having several children born in Cambridge. The family names Francis, Samuel, Thomas, John, Anne and Sarah fit remarkably with the family in Maldon, co. Essex. The only problem is that his age 85 at death 20 Aug. 1671 given in the Cambridge record and Savage, does not jibe with the baptismal date, All Saints, Maldon, which is 1593 instead of 1586. However, it must be remembered that elderly people did (and do) make mistakes in recalling their age. Note that the birth of the first child at 27, Francis, Jr., would be much more reasonable than at 34 if the earlier date is to be taken as correct.

While there are quite a few court records about the marine experiences of Thomas Moore, the Boston mariner, thus far the writer has found no clear connection with the Greenleaf’s even though a number of business associates appear in both family records. Only one possible evidence has turned up and that in the Suffolk Superior Court Records which show that a Thomas Moore, in July 1675, was bound for the appeal of John and Thomas Wells, carpenters, in a case brought by Timothy Batts. John Wells was the husband of Mary Greenleaf, possibly one of Enoch’s daughters. While there is nothing conclusive about this other evidence may still be found. Samuel Moore, one 0£ the brothers, was in the Barbadoes. We know Edmund had trading ventures in the West Indies involving his Hill stepson (see his will) so records in that area may give further evidence. A further search for a record of the marriage of Francis, Sr., and Katherine might be informative.

In any case the discovery of this Moore material gives more substance to the story of Edmund Greenleaf, the identity of his wife Sara, and adds to our knowledge of his descendants and progenitors.

The “Genealogy of the Greenleaf Family” by J.E. Greenleaf mentions 9 children found on the parish records of St. Mary’s la Tour. He speculated that there might be two more: John, born about 1632, and who died in Boston, 16 Dec. 1712; Mary, referred to in “Savage’s Dictionary,” Vol. IV. p. 476: “John Wells, of Newbury, took oath of allegiance, May, 1669, and was made a freeman the same month, a carpenter, married 5 March 1669, Mary, probably a daughter of Edmund Greenleaf, and had, 16 December, Mary, who died the year following. Mary, again, born 16 Feb. 1673. William, born 15 Jan. 1675.”17 “Sara, First Wife of Edmund Greenleaf” – Summation of Evidence In Mrs. Dorothy Greenleaf Boynton’s article, of January 1968 in the [NEHGR 122:28-36], she admits that not much headway had been made in determining Edmund Greenleaf’s ancestry.

There had also been prior articles that commented on Sara’s ancestry.

The [NEHGR 38:100], in January 1884, contained an obit for a Charles Beaman that positively stated that the wife of Edmund Greenleaf was Sarah DOLE. That same assurance was given in James Edward Greenleaf’s “Genealogy of the Greenleaf Family, 1896, pp.71-74, 190; which said, “Edmund Greenleaf married Sarah Dole.” This error has carried on to the present day.

Mrs. Boynton states that she, “by chance”, noticed in the Essex volumes of the “Boyd Marriage Index” this entry, “Moor Sar and Edm Greenleaf Langford”. She noted that the time of their 1611 marriage appeared to fit, and this appeared to offer a reason for Thomas Moor overseeing Edmund’s will.

Roger D. Joslyn wrote an article, “Edmund Greenleaf & Sarah Moore Further On the Marriage”, in 1980 in [TAG 56:107], that Sara and Edmund were married in Langford Parish, Essex, England. The entry for 1611 reads: “Edmund Greeneleaf and Sarah More were married the second of Julye.” This entry can now be found in the Essex Record Office in Chelmsford, Essex, England.

Mrs. Boynton engaged the services of Mr. T. Woodard to search the records in England for proof, so that she could be clearly certain.

The recently posted Vital Records and wills are what were found that prove that Edmund’s wife was Sara MOORE. We have the wills, first of all, of Sara’s paternal grandparents, Nicholas and Willamin MOORE. Although wills for Sara’s father, Enoch, or mother Catherine, have not been found; the will of her brother, Samuel MORE and her uncle, Edward MOORE, we have.

First, in Samuel Moore’s will, he clearly says, “Item I give unto my sister Sara the wife of Edmund Grinleaf of Ipswich in the county of Suffolk..” And, Samuel’s will goes beyond identifying Sara as his sister. Samuel also identifies their father as Enoch Moore, saying, “Item I give unto my father Enoch More of Haverill…” That alone, without going further, is proof.

While Nicholas Sr.’s will does not identify Sara Moore Greenleaf, Willamin’s will clearly identifies Sara Moore as the daughter of her son Enoch, saying, “Item I give and bequeath unto Sara Moore the daughter of my sonne Enoch Moore…”

Nicholas’ will identifies his wife as Willamin, saying, “Item I give and bequeath unto Willamin my wife…” He also identifies one of his sons as Thomas Moore, saying, “now in the tenure and occupation of Thomas Moore my son…”

Edward’s will identifies both Thomas Moore and Enoch Moore as his brothers, hence sons of Nicholas Moore Sr. and Willamin. In Edward’s will he says, “my Brother Enoche Moore” and “my Brother Thomas Moore”.

Therefore, we can clearly see that Nicholas & Willamin Moore are the paternal grandparents of Sara (More) Greenleaf, and Enoch is her father.

In addition, vital records at All Saints Parish, Maldon, Essex, Eng., show that Catherine became Enoch’s wife on 23 Nov 1585, and their daughter Sara, was baptized there, 13 Dec 1588. These facts close the case of Sara (More) Greenleaf’s ancestry.

Other valuable points that stand out in this article are these:

Samuel’s will clearly states that in 1615, when his will was executed, that Sara and Edmund had two sons, John and Enoch. Based on the baptismal records alone, since there has never been found a baptismal record for John, we would not have known of a firstborn son named John. This, according to Mrs. Boynton, “explains the bequest of Edmund Greenleaf to a grandson James, his eldest son’s son.”

Also, Mrs. Boynton remarks regarding Sara, that it “seems apparent that she came from a family of considerable substance”. The contents of the wills bear testimony to that.

There are also other family wills that have been found. The will of Elizabeth, the widow of Edward Moore, executed 18 Jan 1622, bequeathed her property to her children of her first marriage, and is of less interest to the Greenleaf-Moore descendants.

However, Nicholas Moore the Younger’s will, executed 21 April 1646, and probated 23 June 1646, may be of interest. Also the will of Francis Moore, Jr., of Cambridge, Mass, that was probated, 23 Feb 1689, may be of interest to some. Francis Moore, Jr, Sara’s nephew, called Thomas Moore, the mariner of Boston, his brother.

The Moore wills of England are located in Essex Record Office of Chelmsford, Essex, England.

–Sandi Goetze <sandi@frazmtn.com>.18

The 12 known children of Edmund2 Greenleaf and Sarah Moore were as follows:

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3. i. John3 Greenleaf14,13,13 was born circa 1612 in co. Suffolk, England.14 He died after 1615 in England.14

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4. ii. Enoch Greenleaf3,3,3 was baptized on 1 December 1613 in St. Mary’s la Tour, Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England.14,9 He was buried on 12 September 1617 in St. Margaret’s parish, Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England.19,9

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5. iii. Samuel Greenleaf3,3,3 was baptized on 8 January 1615/16 in St. Margaret’s parish, Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England.14 He was buried on 5 March 1616/17 in St. Margaret’s parish, Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England.19,9

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+ 6. iv. Enoch Greenleaf, baptized 20 March 1617/18 in St. Margaret’s parish, Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England; married Mary [_____].

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+ 7. v. Sarah Greenleaf, baptized 26 March 1620/21 in St. Margaret’s parish, Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England; married William Hilton.

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+ 8. vi. Elizabeth Greenleaf, baptized 16 January 1621/22 in St. Margaret’s parish, Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England; married Giles Badger; married Richard Browne.

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9. vii. Nathaniel Greenleaf20,20,20 was baptized on 27 June 1624 in St. Margaret’s parish, Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England.21,19,9He was buried on 24 July 1633 in St. Margaret’s parish, Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England.19

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+ 10. viii. Judith Greenleaf, born 2 September 1625 in Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England; married Henry Somerby; married Tristram Coffin Jr.

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+ 11. ix. Captain Stephen Greenleaf Sr., baptized 10 August 1628 in St. Margaret’s parish, Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England; married Elizabeth Coffin; married Esther Weare.

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+ 12. x. Mary Greenleaf, married John Wells.

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13. xi. Daniel Greenleaf22,22,22 was baptized on 14 August 1631 in St. Margaret’s parish, Ipswich, co. Suffolk, England.23,19,9He died on 5 December 1654 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 23.9,24

He was also known as Daniell Grenleife.24

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+ 14. xii. John Greenleaf, born circa 1632 in co. Suffolk, England; married Hannah Veazie.

Sarah Jurdaine and Wilson were married before 1662. She and William Hills were married before 1663. She died in 1671 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. Sarah’s marriage to Edmund was a rather unhappy one.

There were no known children of Edmund2 Greenleaf and Sarah Jurdaine.

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